Author: Martin Haswell

Memorial JK

The true architect of the capital, Brasília, wasn’t Oscar Niemeyer but Juscelino Kubitschek, popularly known as JK, the President of Brasil from 1956 to 1961. From a pedestal high above his mausoleum, his statue looks out over the city that he, Juscelino Kubitschek, was the real father of.

Museu Nacional

The Museu Nacional is one of Oscar Niemeyer’s iconic works in Brasília. They’re all iconic, the whole city is. Not just Niemeyer deserves the credit but Lúcio Costa, the planner and the landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx, with the the 30,000 construction workers who built a modern city in 41 months.

Iguaçu Falls

The Iguaçu Falls aren’t the widest in the world, nor the tallest but with up to 300 separate waterfalls visible from both banks of the river, from the Brazilian and the Argentinian sides, the area is spectacular beyond comprehension.

Pampulha

Pampulha, the chic northern suburb of Belo Horizonte was laid out in the 1940’s by the young Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer for Juscelino Kubitschek, then the city’s Mayor. Twenty years later, when Kubitschek became President, he made Niemeyer lead architect for the design of the new capital, Brasilia. The artificial lake at the heart of Pampulha sometimes explodes with bright green algal blooms which give the other-worldliness to this photo.

Pinhão

This combination of pinhão and banana, against a blue background, echoes the colors of the Brazilian flag, something I hadn’t noticed when I took the photo. The pinhão is the nut of the Paraná pine (Araucaria augustifolia) the iconic tree of the mountain skyline and the nuts are very popular here in season, and have their own festival, Festa Nacional do Pinhão in Lages.